Monday, December 15, 2008

Up until then I only knew it was a movement of the people

I recognize that it doesn't actually help, but I've slowly become a philosophy job wiki fiend. At least you hear something even if it's not clear whether the information actually means anything. If 5 people say they have interviews at a school and you haven't heard, you're obviously toast. But what exactly does it mean when one person says they have an interview? Am I still toast? Is it stupid to think there would be two rounds of calls (probably, but can't I still hold out hope?)

All I'm saying is it'd be nice to hear rejections (even better to hear about interviews) because the half knowledge that some other person got an interview isn't doing much good. (p.s. If you have a lot of interviews, you can go brag on this PJ discussion board thread.)

-- Second Suitor

6 comments:

missamerica said...

It appears a high percentage of the people who are getting interviews aren't posting that news on the wiki. Granted, some schools do take a week, or more, to contact candidates (e.g. Georgetown's metaphysics search and Saint Vincent College). But I'd be surprised if the majority of departments took that approach.

tithonus said...

The wiki is not reliable. And since we don't know the calling patterns of the departments, even if we know for sure that someone has been called for an interview, we can't be sure that more people won't be called tomorrow. A few dittos on the wiki doesn't tell you much. When you applied you knew that it was very unlikely that you would get an interview. The fact that others have been called might make it a bit less likely, but your chances were already so low, the difference is negligible. Perhaps the wiki simply shatters false hope--delusions about our chances of getting interviews. I suppose that might be a useful role for the wiki to play. . . .

Any status from the source, any status at all, is helpful. City College has been especially polite. They sent candidates an email acknowledging their application. And they sent another email saying when they should hear back if they have been selected. I'm sure that this is very much appreciated. Someone should thank Professor Marinoff, the members of the search committee, and the admin who must have processed all the apps. (Probably 150+) . . . Hopefully, they will also send an email letting those who have not been chosen know as well.

All departments should do this. It only requires is setting up a comma separated list of email addresses (which might take an hour or two at most), writing a form letter, and hitting send. . . . .

zero said...

I am not a wiki fiend at all. I look at it only reluctantly and with a sense of abject dread and terror. And yet I look at it a couple of times a day. (Which, I imagine, makes me relatively restrained.) Still, I can only barely take looking at it. I would compare it to looking at a website that will tell you whether your very ill grandmother has died today.

I don't want to get into a whole big thing here, but I would argue that it's unlikely that departments typically space out their interview calls very much. So maybe they didn't call everybody today, but if a couple of days go by, that's probably that.

I would also argue that the difference between "probably not" and "just-plain-not" is not negligible. At least it doesn't feel negligible. God, I hate this shit.

However, I agree that Marinoff is the shit. Another guy who is awesome is Don Hubin at The Ohio State.

bball said...

I just got an interview for a position that, according to the wiki, set up interviews last Friday (12/12). I don't think one should read too much into this. Since the emails to contact candidates were separated by a weekend and a Monday.

PapaM said...

it's a bit off topic, but i have a question. i recently discovered that i was lucky enough to get some interviews at the conference. yet i didn't register for the conference because i wouldn't have gone sans interview. however, the apa, in its infinite fucking wisdom, cuts off advance registration after 12/5. and, conveniently, the apa national office is closed until... the conference. my query: can i register for the conference on-site on the 27th? will i still be able to interview? (it's my first time at this sweaty palm fest, so i'm pretty ignorant about how things work, or don't, as the case may be).

thanks.

Admin said...

reply to PapaM: yes you can register on-site-- both for the conference and for placement. You end up with file #800 or something like that, but you're still registered.