Friday, June 26, 2009

Just wondering

I know.. we've been busy.. We'll back back for more good old fashioned bitching in a while.

Before that, it seems like a good way to expand the job search may be to look overseas. Over at the Brook's Blog (and on some of the philosophy listservs) there've been a some non-USA job postings. I've heard before that it's harder than you think to get the VISA or whatever you need for work permits in Europe. Somehow it seems like philosophy departments should be able to hire people without thinking about that stuff (but maybe that's just my American bias... you mean I have to listen to what another government says I can do?!?). Makes you feel like you should fool with international justicy stuff.

All that was to say, is it actually that hard to get work permits or whatever to take a position somewhere like the UK or Netherlands?

-- Second Suitor

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

it is easy in canada.

Anonymous said...

US nationals work in the UK all the time, so I guess it's not too hard. My only worry on jobs for Sept. is that it might take several months (as it does for a non-citizen coming to the US), so the time frame might be too tight. I'd guess that an email to the dept. would help, or even to Thom Brooks himself, as he probably has some insight, being an American working in the UK.

Dylan said...

No big deal if it's the UK, and I suspect all of Europe is like the UK here. For me it took 2 or 3 months -- my memory's hazy -- and a bunch of paperwork. Just apply for those jobs and worry about that after you get hired.

Anonymous said...

I have not looked at the job postings for Europe, but I have heard over and over again that if you get a position as a foreigner in France, the taxes will be overwhelming. FWIW.

the Virgin lover said...

Sure. I'm going to Ireland right now-- Pursuing my PhD at Maynooth. I think Europe is a great place to teach for awhile, especially when the USA has become as boring as it is these days. But eh, what has changed?

Anonymous said...

I think Anonymous 2:36 has been watching too much fox news. Income tax in France is about the same as it is the US for incomes typical of academics. (Its a bit higher for those who make over $100,000--but I doubt that affects many on this blog).

Similarly, if you are an American citizen working abroad, the first $75,000 you earn is tax free to the IRS.

In sum, if you live in France and earn less than $75,000, your tax situation is going to be about the same as it is here.

Anonymous said...

Very easy in Canada and the UK. It's also pretty easy in East and Southeast Asia, from the experiences of friends of mine. One good friend is teaching at a uni in Singapore and has never been happier.

Anonymous said...

Anon 6:24.

Thanks for the clarification. I don't really seem the reasoning behind the little Fox News comment. Seemed wholly unnecessary, so I suppose reasoning wasn't involved. I had looked at teaching overseas years ago and was told by others who had taught in France that the taxes were high. But, as I said, thanks for clarifying.

FairNBalanced said...

Just a note, if you are an American taking a temporary (2 years or less) post in the UK, you can legally pay no tax to either government. As an above poster noted, you pay no US tax on the first $75,000 anyway. And there is a special UK tax exemption for teachers/professors coming from the US for a temporary post.

See Article 20A in the tax treaty here: http://faculty.law.wayne.edu/McIntyre/text/Treaty_Class/uk_treaty_2002.pdf

I did this successfully during my two-year stint as a teacher in the UK. It's very much worth jumping through the bureaucratic hoops to save thousands of dollars.

Anonymous said...

There is now a couple positions advertised in Germany in the summer JfP. Out of 10 ads, only 1 is tenure track. Nice.

Anonymous said...

Generally speaking, there is no tenure track system in Germany. Jobs at the assistant professor level are always temporary, full professorships are tenured (with a probationary period). There have been talks about (re-)introducing the tenure track system, but it is rather surprising to see such a job advertised at all.