Monday, November 15, 2010

The Job Market Wiki

It seems that people are using the Phylo Wiki again this year. Is there anything else going on? I thought that it was a pretty good wiki last year. I like the RSS feeds, although they take some of the fun out of obsessively hitting the refresh button every 30 seconds.

--Mr. Zero

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm surprised by the amount of schools that already seem to have scheduled first-round interviews.

zombie said...

I'm depressed by the schools that are already scheduling interviews and haven't called me.

Heavy sigh.

I don't think I could deal with RSS. It would shatter my hard candy shell of sweet, sweet delusion.

Anonymous said...

Do all schools in Georgia feel some special need to schedule their interviews super early? Is there perhaps some governmental reason (related to state funding, perhaps)? 4 of the 6 schools listed as having scheduled interviews are in Georgia.

Anonymous said...

"Do all schools in Georgia feel some special need to schedule their interviews super early?"

Yes, they are in Georgia. You haven't been to Georgia, have you? It's a way to get attractive candidates to move to unattractive places. I interviewed with schools last year that interviewed before the APA for just this reason. Had to choose between offer in hand and interview for a much more attractive job in another city.

zombie said...

We seem to have our first suspended search this year: William and Mary.
Dang. I was hoping those days were over.

improfound said...

To atone for my previous imprecision, I decided to call up W&M. The administrative assistant told me that she has not heard anything about the search being suspended. So it's probably best not to believe the wiki on this one.

Xenophon said...

Anon 7:47, so what did you do? Roll the dice or take the job in Georgia? And why did you select that option?

Anonymous said...

"Anon 7:47, so what did you do? Roll the dice or take the job in Georgia? And why did you select that option?"

Everyone told me I'd be a fool to turn down an offer for an on-campus interview even if it was the dream job in the dream city. I took their advice. Not in GA, by the way. I probably would have rolled the dice before doing that, unless it was in Atlanta. In retrospect, I should have taken the offer and gone for the interview. Worst case scenario, I get a free ticket to a cool city. It's not as if the dept. that hired me would have had a hard time replacing me if I got the better offer. They might be pissed and it might be bad form, but we're talking about a decision that will radically alter the course of your life. Moving to the dream city means that me and my main squeeze both get to do what we want and live together. Moving to my current city means that one of us works, the other does some volunteer stuff to try to keep her resume growing, and we plot to try to get into a city where we can both be happy. Which will never happen now. I suppose that the good news is that I didn't burn bridges with all the people I work with now. People who, by the way, all have real lives and much better things to do than interact with me.

I'm starting to think philosophers don't give great advice.

Anonymous said...

Is leadership studies metaphysics or epistemology?

Anonymous said...

Is leadership studies metaphysics or epistemology?

It depends. If you're an epistemologist, then you ask the committee 'How do you know if you're a leader?' If you're a metaphysician, ask 'What makes a leader in the real world?' From there, you talk about your dissertation and how it helps resolve a central question lying at the very heart of leadership studies as we know it.

zombie said...

Some comments (related to other threads). My diss advisor wrote to a colleague at a R1 that I applied to, asking colleague to give my application a look. Colleague had a number of responses:
1. Commented positively on my cover letter (so they DO read them)
2. Commented on the number and quality of the journals I'm published in (said this would really matter to the "hard-core" in the dept, and pointed out two in ethics that would be preferred) -- so number and quality both matter (but also said if my writing sample was great, that would help)
3. Spoke favorably of the breadth of my teaching/research experience
4. Promised to make sure my application "got attention" (so, presumably, it can help to have someone from your dept reach out to a personal contact)
5. Mentioned that there are hundreds of applications (which we already knew)

Will any of this add up to an interview? I'd say it's still a very long shot, but perhaps millimeters closer than otherwise.

Anonymous said...

Zombie's anecdote is a useful one in that while not at all dissertation advisors will actively go to bat for you on the market, it never hurts to ask (or at least provide them with a list of depts. to which you have applied). Of course, if your file is good to begin with, you'll get a look, but a wee preemptive nudge might help (i.e., someone who knows to keep an eye out for your file might be (slightly) more inclined to champion your application).

Xenophon said...

You know, if you don't post more, I'm going to have to put my nervous energy into applying for more of those Open jobs. This isn't exactly a threat (increasing the competition beyond the 600 applications they already have), because I know how vanishingly small my odds are for those jobs, but I'm starting to think a lot of getting an interview is, not random exactly, but apparently random. I go into interviews where people remember the oddest things about my application, and I think, so that's how I got an interview.

Word verification: cunnesse. Way too easy, if only cunnus derived from a verbal stem . . .