Thursday, November 25, 2010

The Turkey King Lives!!!

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

--Mr. Zero

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Yeah, let's eat the dead flesh of factory-raised, steroid-bloated murdered animals to celebrate the destruction of the continent's native peoples. Maybe if I had a sniff of a chance at a job I could find all this amusing, but probably not.

Anonymous said...

Happy American Thanksgiving to all of you.

I have a question: I have applied to a number of schools who sent me letters and cards requesting that I fill out cards that tell the university my sex, race, and sometimes veterans status. Are the readers of this blog sending those back and filling those in online, or are we taking seriously the statements that it is voluntary and has no impact on our employment application?

Anonymous said...

Do I suck? I've gotten no invitations to interview at APA East. I'm going to invest almost $1500 to go. I have a dozen publications and a forthcoming book. I'm starting to think that the job market is wired.

Mr. Zero said...

Hi 9:39,

Yeah. The search committees don't see those. They're required by the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and help the HR department show that the university is in compliance. They are voluntary, and I never fill them out.

Hi 4:12,

You normally won't get any invitations to interview until the 1st or 2nd week of December. Don't start worrying yet. Also, don't go unless you have interviews. Except if you want to see the event before you have interviews. But don't do that unless you can do it on less than $1500.

Anonymous said...

Mr. Zero is right that it is way too early to worry, Anon 4:12. Not only will interviews be set up in December, but the Easterns are only the beginning of a much longer job-market season. I was in your situation last year (book deal, etc.), and I got a few interviews at the Easterns that didn't pan out. I kept applying to jobs through the winter and spring, though, and I ended up getting four campus visits, from which I got two offers: one for a really good two-year visiting gig and one for a t-t position with a decent teaching load (i.e., not the dreaded 4-4 or worse). You've got a great record, so don't lose heart and just keep plugging away: even, and perhaps especially, after the Easterns. Yes, getting a good job is extremely difficult, and nothing can be taken taken for granted. But it looks like you've done what you need to do to situate yourself well.

Anonymous said...

"Do I suck? I've gotten no invitations to interview at APA East. I'm going to invest almost $1500 to go. I have a dozen publications and a forthcoming book. I'm starting to think that the job market is wired."

I'm basically in the same situation. It's early for interviews, however. What I've found strange is that I've been at this for a while and while this summer I was able to land two interviews at amazing places abroad (research departments, brilliant colleagues, amazing cities, permanent positions), I can't get an interview in the states. Prior to this summer, I had two interviews for TT jobs spread over the course of a few years. What gives? Why can I get interviews for amazing jobs abroad and no jobs here in the states?

improfound said...

Hey Anon 4:12 -

Check the job market wiki and you'll see how few schools have actually sent out interview requests.

http://phylo.info/jobs

Anonymous said...

Speaking of $1500, a tip from a more-or-less local: flying into Providence, instead of Boston, might be much cheaper. And as of next week, there's going to finally be an easy way to make it from Providence Airport (TF Green) to downtown Boston by public transportation, for $10.50.
http://bit.ly/hQliaR

Anonymous said...

Seconding 4:46. I've flown through Providence, and it's a dream. It's not worth it if prices are the same, as the train will probably take 1:15, but definitely worth it if cost savings are involved.

Anonymous said...

8:23 AM:

I'm in the same boat. Aside from working in an area of philosophy which is bigger in Europe than in the US, I think part of the situation is that applicant pools are smaller for jobs in continental Europe than in the US. I know this to be true of at least one school I got an interview with, where national laws required that they mail out a list of all applicants. The number of applicants there was significantly smaller than what you'd expect for the same job stateside. Of course, that's a very small sample, but some anecdotal evidence that this may be a factor. Perhaps US degrees are also more valued, so put you in a better light compared to other Europeans applying. I should say, I don't think these are factors in England, where I expect things to be pretty much the same as in the states (and I've had interviews there in the past year too, so, presumably, that's not the whole explanation, at least in my case).

Anonymous said...

Did everyone catch the "dress code and grooming" requirement on the Chronicle ad for Southern Virginia University?

http://svu.edu/student-life/honor-code/dress-and-grooming

Given the nature of the dress code, I find it interesting that the slide show on the university's main website highlights the renegade aesthetics of the Chuck Taylor-wearing university president.

zombie said...

Well that was fun. I noticed they had quite a few typos in that there dress code.

I guess their standards for appearance are more rigorous than their academic standards.

Anonymous said...

Southern Virginia University, with its mission of training leader-servants...

That's the most amazing thing I've ever seen on any university website. Let us all pause for a moment to consider possible interview questions about the curriculum for training leader-servants. What are the key components of this curriculum? How do you think they could do a better job producing leader-servants, the leaders and/or servants of tomorrow? How would you characterize the difference between leader-servants, servant-leaders, servant-servants and leader-leaders? If the school down the road has a mission of training servant-leaders, who wins the annual Big Game?

That last one is serious. I really want to know.

Anonymous said...

According to their bylaws, you're allowed a goatee with a doctor's note.

Xenophon said...

"we all not only exhibit the Standards in our own dress and grooming, we also make “on the spot” corrections when infractions are observed."

"Women's hair is clean and well cared for, and is not shaved without a documented medical justification."

So a woman who's undergoing chemotherapy is going to get stopped 50 times a day to explain the "documented medical condition" that makes her bald? I see a lawsuit coming -- isn't that a violation of FERPA?

Anonymous said...

duh, chemo patients should wear hats...jesus christ.

Tony Soprano said...

Take your hat off.