Monday, November 26, 2012

A new thread

Anonymous requests:
Report where people have been getting 'intriguing' Google searches to their website. Or how often we have been checking to see whether that has been occurring (*sigh*).
Or anything else. Please dear God, anything other than what this thread has deteriorated into.
Sure. Open thread. Newbie questions about APA, interview scheduling, or whatever. Have at it, girls and boys.

~zombie

55 comments:

Anonymous said...

So far, i have had visits from salt lake city and binghamton. Maybe it was just ghe secretary trying to find out my address so that she can send me a PFO to the right place...

Anonymous said...

How do you even know if your personal website has been visited, let lone by whom? I really don't understand.

Anonymous said...

Google Analytics will tell you. Sign up.

Anonymous said...

Or your own website will tell you, if it has a statistics tracking feature. Most sites will give you a list of the IP addresses of your visitors...which one could, theoretically, look up using an IP tracker. If, I mean, one were obsessive in that particular way.

Anonymous said...

Thank heavens for the internets--self-deluded anonymity, resulting in unrestrained rancorous incivility, capped by paranoia of seeking stalker-ID. A perfect absurdist world.

Anonymous said...

During my first year on the market, I created a personal website and signed up for Google Analytics with the intent of seeing which schools were most interested in my application. The data was helpful for reasons that I can't disclose, but I've begun to value having my website for a different reason: my papers are getting attention they would not have had otherwise.

My site has attracted repeat traffic (from people, not bots) from a number of universities in a number of different countries. If you want to get your work out, I'd suggest putting together a nice website.



Anonymous said...

Okay... What's proper APA interview attire (for a male interviewee)? Would a blazer and dress slacks be normal, or at least sufficient? Would a full suit be overdoing it?

My sense is that a full suit is appropriate for an on-campus interview, but maybe a little too much for an APA interview. Does that sound right?

Anonymous said...

7:18, it all depends. If you are interviewing for a job I want, proper male attire (for you) is short-shorts and one of those great "who farted?" t-shirts. If it's for a job I don't want, I imagine a blazer and slacks is fine.

Anonymous said...

7:18 - I would do the full suit for APA, and sports jacket and slacks for on campus (or sports jacket etc for both). If you do the full suit for an on campus, you might feel overdressed. You'll possibly also look more awkward, hanging out in a full suit with others who will be less dressy.

Although it does depend a little on the school - this advice is for a normal philosophy department - if it's a more professional type of school (some are) then perhaps full suit for both.

Anonymous said...

First year on the market. What's the latest schools will notify you for interviews at the APA?

Anonymous said...

Most schools will notify people before Christmas, but I once had a school call me on the morning of the first day of the conference

Anonymous said...

Google Analytics is great. Last year, there was a hit on my website that originated nearby each department that interviewed me. Usually it happened a week or two before the interviews were scheduled.

Beware, though. There were also hits from a number of other schools I didn't land interviews with. Still, it can be a boost to know that you were at least on their radar.

I suppose the data is barely useful -- it should be taken with a grain of salt. It has the potential to get one's hopes up needlessly. But in a process that is completely opaque, for me it was better than nothing.

Anonymous said...

I am now seriously regretting that I never found the time to create a webpage this summer. Sigh.

Anonymous said...

Anon 7:55 said:

"First year on the market. What's the latest schools will notify you for interviews at the APA?"

7:55 ...I am a first year as well and I asked this question on another thread. I was told that some SCs will notify as late as 3 days before the APA.

Anonymous said...

Post-doc interviews: how do these go? Is there a relevant difference between these and TT interviews?

imprecise said...

If you don't have time to set up a proper website, you can use Academia.edu. It gives you a place to upload papers, CV, and lots of other stuff, and it looks relatively professional (though not customized, like your own site would be). I get lots of hits on my papers, though the analytics function, so far as I know, only tells you what countries the hits come from. Still, it's a way to get your work out there in about 10 minutes. And it gives you a stable URL that you can put on your CV or whatnot.

Anonymous said...

7:16, you might consider registering a profile on Academia.edu. It's less work than making a webpage from scratch, so it might not be too late. You can post your papers there and any other information you want available to departments who search for you. It also has some rudimentary analytics, (and notifies you when someone searches for you and returns a hit to your profile), albeit less sophisticated than that offered by Google Analytics.

Anonymous said...

7:55: I got contacted for an APA interview (my only one, the other 2 were skype) on Christmas eve. They only wanted to interview in person. Naturally, my airfare at that point was skyrocket high, and I had to pay the on-site more expensive registration fee. If you think you have a realistic chance of an interview, book refundable tickets now.

Anonymous said...

This is a plea to everyone: update the wiki regularly. Pretty please.

Anonymous said...

@7:35 AM

In my experience, there is no difference.

Anonymous said...

8:17, I had a similar experience. But refundable tickets cost *so* much more. Ugh.

My solution: I convinced myself that I wanted to go anyway, so I just booked it. (Yes, this did require preternatural feats of self-deception.)

Anonymous said...

I'm pretty sure Southwest Airlines tickets can be refunded in the form of credit for another flight, to be used within a year. So, if you buy a ticket and end up not going to the APA it's not a financial loss, so long as you use the credit with Southwest within 12 months.

Anonymous said...

7:55 I have booked a bed in a hostel in Atlanta (the booking is free) for about $25 a night, and I purchased a roundtrip Greyhound ticket to Atlanta for $205. So I can get the whole trip for less than $325.

Sure, I will be exhausted and crotchety from the grueling travel/poor accommodations. But the important thing is that I will get there, and take a shot.

BunnyHugger said...

Been around the job market block quite a few times now. I put a high value on having the holidays with my family. As a result I just will not go to the APA without interviews. My tactics have been:

1) Buy a train ticket (I live far enough east that this is feasible but grueling) because Amtrak tickets are refundable.

2) Buy a plane ticket on the assumption that if I don't get interviews, I'll eat the $150 flight change fee and use the ticket on some other trip. (I travel a lot to visit family.) Still better than paying the whole fare to go to a conference I would not have gone to given my druthers.

Of course there's also the matter of the hotel. I either book a room I can cancel or accept a one-day charge (which I have done in the past when booking the conference hotel at the student rate). Again, I don't let sunk costs send me to the APA to spend more.

I always waited until Christmas Eve to cancel, though my placement adviser had told me that Dec. 23 was the latest anyone would contact you. I did read the report elsewhere in this post that someone had received an interview request on Christmas Eve. I suspect this is unusual, but I always did wait until the evening of the 24th to call it off.

For what it's worth, here's my anecdote: in something like five rounds on the market (between the mid-2000s and the present), I never got an APA interview request later than Dec. 21 and typically received them around Dec. 15. I canceled my APA visit twice (and in both of those years did get other interviews, mostly by phone).

Anonymous said...

I recently talked to the chair of a search committee, hiring at a fairly good SLAC for a common AOS.

The chair told me they received about 150 applications, of which less than 50 were legitimate applications for the AOS in question.

Do those numbers seem representative for other hiring departments? Because those odds appear much better than I'd been led to believe was the norm.

zombie said...

TT vs postdoc depends on the nature of the postdoc. My postdoc was research only, and on a specific area (as dictated by the grant). It also required a high output of peer-reviewed papers, conferences, etc. So the PI was only interested in my research potential and interest in the subject, and did not care about my teaching. For a research plus teaching postdoc, I imagine it would be more like a typical interview. Forva teaching fellowship, I don't know.

zombie said...

Male dress: minimally, slacks and blazer, tie, clean shoes. This is basically a variation on what the male SC members will wear, although some might be in a suit, some might be tweedy, or in a sweater. If you're comfortable in a suit, and you have a suit and dress shirt, you can't really go wrong by dressing up rather than down. Don't break the bank buying a suit. Don't go goth or emo (are there still emos?) or steampunk (cool as that is), or full Chalmers (unless you ARE Chalmers, in which case wear whatever you like).

There's a Japanese saying: The nail that sticks up gets hammered down. When it comes to interview attire, you don't want to be the nail that sticks up. What you wear should not be a distraction to the people interviewing you.

FYI, socks should match your pants, according to the sartorial "rules"

Anonymous said...

@Zombie,

So on the Venn diagram for "Philosophy Department Search Committees" & "Miserable fucking sock-Nazi's" there's some overlap that isn't shaded out? How depressing.

Anonymous said...

I wore wool slacks with a shirt and tie but a sweater instead of a sportcoat to my APA interviews last year, and got campus invites for all of them.

Anonymous said...

"FYI, socks should match your pants, according to the sartorial 'rules.'"

I would no more teach, or conduct interviews, in anything other than a suit and tie than I would do so in pajamas or a swimsuit. I wear suits when it's 100 degrees and 90% humidity outside. And even I wouldn't notice someone's socks. So I think you're pretty safe.

Anonymous said...

Regarding dress: For men, a blazer and slacks (with or without tie), a suit, or even slacks and a nice sweater are all fine, so long as your dress successfully telegraphs to the committee that you are taking the interview seriously (so, no wrinkles, tuck your shirt in, etc.). More important than the actual outfit, though, is that you wear something that fits you well and in which you feel comfortable. Your dress will only be an issue if it somehow draws attention to itself: if your jacket comes over your hands, or your shirt has a big stain on it, or you're constantly fidgeting because the outfit makes you feel uncomfortable, you can distract the interviewers from the content of the interview and make yourself seem less professional. So don't wear a suit if you've never worn a suit before: you will feel awkward and that will make you seem awkward. Same goes for fly-outs.

CTS said...

@November 27, 2012 11:52 AM:

That strikes me as a low number of applications (although, I am sorry to say, the percentage of folks who just don't qualify seems to grow every year in this awful 'market').

As for male dress: I think anything that looks, as Zombie says, you do not want to look odd. Unfortunately, many people do not realize that they might look odd to others (especially those who are older). So, a kind of 'uniform' of dress shirt, slacks, maybe a blazer is probably the way to go.

That said, I do not think anyone should be going crazy over dress. We've had men in lovely suits who were such jerks we never would invite them to campus. The only time I recall any of us noting our candidates' clothing was one year when (a) we over scheduled and had two ill SC members, so that we were all miserable by the last day, and (b) we had one candidate who wore what I could only describe as a sweatsuit and another who wore something I could not describe.

zombie said...

I notice socks and shoes. Perhaps you all saw me lurking around the escalators checking out your footwear in Boston. Now my cover is blown.

But I personally wouldn't hold it against anyone if they wore non-matchy socks. I think socks, like ties, ought to admit of personal expression. But I don't make the rules re: socks.

I'd be surprised if SCs actually care much about socks, although it's possible there are sock Nazis among them.

Anonymous said...

From a first year on the job market: skirt with jacket or pants with jacket for female candidates at the APA? Do SC members of the jerk or non-jerk varieties read anything into this choice?

Anonymous said...

This is 2:16 again (the one who wore a sweater). I wore bright green socks, too.

Anonymous said...

I had a search committee comment on my shoes during an interview. But then again, I'm a woman, and maybe they thought this was a way to get me to want to work at their school?

zombie said...

5:40 -- see the thread on Interviewing While Female.
The recommendation is to avoid "overly feminine" clothing, but that might just mean don't dress like Stevie Nicks. A super short skirt is not a good idea, but a professional skirt that you can comfortably sit in should be fine. I always went with pants and jacket myself. Less to worry about.

Also don't dress like Nicki Minaj.

Professional attire is somewhat less restrictive for women than men, but that probably means there's more to scrutinize. As before, don't be the nail that sticks out.

zombie said...

2:16 -- were they your lucky socks?

Rule Number One: Always wear your lucky socks.

Anonymous said...

@9:18 AM: Let me preface this by saying that I hate the wiki.

Nonetheless, I've experienced a lot of stress from SCs that simply do not disclose information. In particular, I think it's kind of awful when candidates have no information about when hires have been made after a first round interview or campus visit. (This happened once: no news, no wiki update, then a PFO form letter 9 months after a campus visit.)

I'm on a search committee now - and I'll be personally (anonymously) updating the wiki for that job. It's outside my professional boundaries to do much more - but nonetheless, I think it's important for candidates to have access to that sort of information.

Anonymous said...

9:13AM here. Thanks for your message, 11:13PM. FWIW, I hate the wiki too. But that's not inconsistent with the desire that it be updated. So I'm grateful to you (and all others) who answer my plea.

Anonymous said...

I like that the Wiki is there, although it stresses me out.

Anybody have any insight on how up to date it is? That is, any of you have invitations that aren't showing up on the Wiki?

Anonymous said...

Job Market Newbie here...just a quick question for clarification...when people on this site talk about "updating the wiki" I assume they are talking about the wiki on the Phylo website. Is that assumption correct?

Anonymous said...

I have a question about cover letters. This is my second year on the market, my first year with Ph.D. in hand. I learned the hard way last year that I should make cover letters personal to the department (e.g. mention the department mission statement and how I might fit in to the department). Are there any other suggestions? I always introduce myself and give the highlights of my teaching and research at the beginning, so I guess I am just asking for suggestions on how to make the letter more personal (without sounding too sycophantic). Good luck to everyone on the market, btw!

Anonymous said...

"Job Market Newbie here...just a quick question for clarification...when people on this site talk about "updating the wiki" I assume they are talking about the wiki on the Phylo website. Is that assumption correct?"

Yes.

Anonymous said...

3 jobs updated in one day - does this signal the opening of the floodgates? (*whimper* please? I can't take this waiting anymore...)

Anonymous said...

why do people torture themselves by acting like the shit is happening now? there are only outliers now. the shit is not happening. the shit will commence happening in like two weeks. chill.

Anonymous said...

Just to echo 7:07's general point: It's really too early for job candidates to start pulling their hair out and checking out the wiki every hour. A couple years ago, my department had its shit together and began contacting candidates to arrange APA interviews a bit earlier than usual. That was December 8th. (I know that's lame, by the way. Totally lame.)

Anonymous said...

Perhaps this isn't "the shit," but it is at least that wet fart that let's you know that the full shit is on the way.

Anonymous said...

first time on the job market. thanks to 7:07 and 9:04 for giving us some perspective on the timeline. would anyone care to give a more detailed description of the timeline leading up to the APA.

i happened to have recently visited the old job market blog. don't ask. the threads from around 2007 gave evidence that applicants were being contacted about APA interviews as late as Dec. 18. is that normal or are those outliers too? the thread even suggested that some PFOs were getting sent out mid-Dec.

how does this timeline match up with the experience of others?

Mr. Zero said...

In my experience, the end of November is too early. The first week of December is when things start happening, but you shouldn't worry if you don't have anything after the first week--it starts out as a trickle. The second week of December is the main week. You're as likely to hear during the third week as you are during the first. Dec. 18th is a little late, but not crazy. The latest I've heard of is Dec. 23rd.

And as SCs increasingly interview outside the APA meeting, it gets less and less "doomy" to not have any interviews scheduled by the time the APA rolls around. Last year I got an interview request the day after the APA ended. The year before that I got an interview request while sitting in the airport waiting to fly back from a flyout. That year was my best interview year so far, and I didn't have any APA interviews.

zombie said...

9:23: Minimally, you need to mention the school and department by name (and address it to a person by name). Say something about why you're interested in the job. Is it a small school? Why do you want to teach at a small school? What's your experience with small schools? Big university? What's your experience with that setting, that type of student population? Me personally, I adjusted according to the type of job, and what else they asked for in the ad. If they asked for a teaching statement and research statement, I did not spend a lot of time repeating that stuff in the letter. If it's a SLAC or they really care about teaching, you want to put your teaching info at the top, your research interests at the bottom. Research at the top if you're applying for a research job.
By the end of the application season, I'd have four or five letter templates based on customized letters -- something to cover just about any type of job.
You need to show that you know what the job is, and what the dept's program is like. Anyone can go to the school's website, but anyone can also fail to go to the school's website. Show you're in the first category.

Anonymous said...

Open Question: How do folks deal with rejection every year? I've only done this for two years, and it's already quite disheartening.

Andoria said...

I realize that this blog serves many who are on the market for their first tenure-track position, but I am curious if anyone could speak to the following:

I have had my current tenure-track position for a year, but it is a heavy teaching load (4/4, often including an overload course for a little extra money), and I am finally publishing at a steady rate. I would like to be in a place where I can focus a bit more on research and where the class size is much smaller.

Any ideas of when it's "too soon" to go on the market? What about "too late"?

Anonymous said...

Too soon: If you are ready, it is not too soon. Tis your life and you have no reason to feel guilty about exploring your alternatives.

Too late: Never, up to a point and relative to how productive you are. That said, my impression is that third year and tenure year are the most common points to test the waters.

Andoria said...

Anon: good points, both.