Friday, May 27, 2016

A NEWER permanent thread to share job info (5/27/16)

A lot of people in the comments seem interested in having space to discuss or request information about specific jobs. If providing information and if possible, please provide the source of your information.
Since you all seem to find it useful, here's our third permanent thread for this. (Big ups to our moderators!)
In the future, after this isn't at the top of the page, you can find this thread in the sidebar. Here's a picture, with the place to find this thread in the future.

72 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thank you for hosting this!

1) does anyone have any word (or non-word) on the Arkansas VAP?

2) Georgia college and state: did anyone else get reference requests this week despite not being chosen for an on campus?

Anonymous said...

11:50am

Yes to (2). And, no word about (1). On their website, my application is still under consideration.

Anonymous said...

Anyone know the status of Anna Maria College's search?

Anonymous said...

Anna Maria had been listed on Phylo as interview (or higher), but it's gone now.

Anonymous said...

Has anyone have any information concerning the University of North Alabama VAP?

Anonymous said...

Having failed to secure anything (TT or NTT) at this point, and with no real hope for outstanding applications... Is there any hope for more NTT jobs being advertised? What's my next course of action? Find a non-academic job, maintain some kind of affiliation, and try to publish enough to survive til next cycle?

Anonymous said...

Hi 2:26,

Can you find adjunct/lecturer work at a nearby College/University or Community College? That would be good—even if it's just picking up one class. Send cold-emails with a CV and teaching statement to all schools in driving distance. For my first go at the market, when I didn't get a visiting position, I did this and found something to keep the teaching aspect of the CV alive. But definitely look for a non-academic job in case that doesn't come through.

As for the affiliation bit—Can you get some sort of affiliation from the school you did graduate work at or your most recent institute? I had year that I was a visiting assistant prof for sabbatical replacement and came up dry job-wise for the next year. The department was happy to give me an affiliated scholar status (which basically kept my email and library access alive). Initially that status was good until the end of the next fall semester and the department said I could have it indefinitely...luckily I was offered another one year position in mid-June.

best of luck!

Anonymous said...

Wtf!

Anonymous said...

And...we begin again. Good luck, may the odds be with us. What a sh**ty year.

Anonymous said...

Only a shitty year? The market has contracted more than the sphincter of a seven year old on a roller coaster at the apex before the big drop. If you're not plan B'ing, you're not thinking straight.

Anonymous said...

Anyone with news on the Elon position?

Anonymous said...

News on the SUNY stony brook lecturer position?

Anonymous said...

2:26 - I'm the chair of a SLAC philosophy department. This week I realized I needed some adjuncts, and to save time I just went through the materials of people who had cold-emailed me. There were some great folks, so I had no need to put out an ad. So I recommend cold-emailing, if there are opportunities in your area.

Anonymous said...

"This week I realized I needed some adjuncts"

Thanks for being part of the problem. I'm sure the under-paid faculty you will dump work on will grovel appropriately, and thank you for the opportunity to continually stall their careers.

Anonymous said...

6:52

??? What kind of ass-hole comment is that?!

For one thing, SLACs tend NOT to use adjunct work unnecessarily. At the two SLAC institutions I've most recently worked at adjunct work was often used to pick up the slack in say 1 or 2 classes a term (say, if a prof had gone on parental or medical leave) but this was not frequent and was tied to various sorts unforeseen leave. Sometimes adjuncts were hired for 1-semester sabbaticals and hired with full benefits for the semester. Usually, the departments scrambled to either pick up missing teaching assignments on their own or requested extra money for one addition course so they could offer a full-time teaching load.

Second, it's one thing to realize that one or two classes need filling and then seek an adjunct (especially in June)...that's not contributing to the problem...it's another to _RELY ON_ adjunct work for most of a departments teaching load. I've had jobs in which the latter was true...4 tenure stream faculty and 8 adjuncts, most of whom had fuller teaching loads than the TT-folks. What the SLAC-chair offered the cold-emailers is nothing like posting an add on philjobs for a 4/4 or 5/5 with no benefits and a salary below 50K, which happens all too often. These two scenarios contribute to the problem.

Third, chances are the person who accepts the work had a bum-year of job search (perhaps that's why the SLAC-chair had a bunch of cold emails in their inbox) and picking up a course, as was suggested by 7:48 on June 8, would actually help their career. Would it be better if one or two folks picked up a class or two each for a semester or if no such opportunity was offered?

Fourth, depending on the SLAC, they pay much, much better than public schools, even for adjunct work and so there is less worry about under-paid faculty comparatively speaking. At my first SLAC (where I adjuncted) I was paid 3,500/class (with 20 students/class). I took that readily over the State University that wanted to pay a little more than 2,000 a class (with about 35-40 students/class). These schools were a mere 15 minutes a part.

Anonymous said...

"??? What kind of ass-hole comment is that?!"

The kind designed to remind people that "universities" are not to blame for the adjunct crisis, but actual faculty who make these decisions.

"For one thing, SLACs tend NOT to use adjunct work unnecessarily."

Bully for them for not being quite as exploitative as other institutions.

"say, if a prof had gone on parental or medical leave"

And, of course, it is always "necessary" to replace a full-time faculty member with a part-time (and exploited) one.

"Sometimes adjuncts were hired for 1-semester sabbaticals and hired with full benefits for the semester."

I have never heard of such a practice, but I approve. I hope the SLAC chair on this thread takes notes, and offers full benefits to those adjuncts hired.

"Third, chances are the person who accepts the work had a bum-year of job search (perhaps that's why the SLAC-chair had a bunch of cold emails in their inbox) and picking up a course, as was suggested by 7:48 on June 8, would actually help their career."

Hahahahahahaha! Yes, because we all know how valuable adjuncting is on the market. I'm sure if we checked the list of TT hires this past year, the list would be littered with people who proved their worth to the field by adjuncting. (This line that picking up adjuncting work is a good career move is insulting, and people should stop believing the lie.)

"Would it be better if one or two folks picked up a class or two each for a semester or if no such opportunity was offered?"

It would be better if people waiting for those courses had a stable Plan B in place, and did not need to rely on hoping someone needs to fill a last-minute course. But that's a different conversation.

"At my first SLAC (where I adjuncted) I was paid 3,500/class (with 20 students/class). I took that readily over the State University that wanted to pay a little more than 2,000 a class (with about 35-40 students/class). These schools were a mere 15 minutes a part.

Yes, $3,500 is better than $2,000, but its' still shit pay.

Anonymous said...

SLAC chair here. Perhaps my comment triggered rage (a completely justified response, given the awful realities of the job market) because it sounded heartless. I wasn't making any larger comment on the adjunctification of higher ed (which I detest), I was responding to someone's request for advice. FWIW, 7:56's comments are spot on. We use adjuncts to fill in for sabbaticals, medical leaves, paternity leaves, fellowship leaves, and a number of other situations. And our adjuncts get paid more than $3500/class (still a pitiable amount, to be sure, but better than some places). This is not to deny that the adjunctification of higher education is abominable -- it most definitely is, and should be fought at every turn. But if I don't fill those courses with adjuncts, they don't get taught, which would cause huge problems for my students. And, without going into details, it worked out quite well for the folks I hired.

Anonymous said...

Agree with 7:56. The blame primarily lies not with department chairs who take the time to post advice to early career blog threads but with institutions that continually exploit adjunct labor rather than opening up full-time or TT lines where it's clear that they are needed. Further, my sense is that even in those cases, department chairs are often the ones advocating and pleading for these lines and for better treatment of the adjuncts that help keep their departments running. While the adjunct crisis is brutal, I don't believe that adjunct work itself is the problem, at least when used responsibility and as intended.

Anonymous said...

SLAC chair again. This time with a couple specific responses to Anon 9:14, whose comment was posted after I chimed in the second time.

"The kind designed to remind people that 'universities' are not to blame for the adjunct crisis, but actual faculty who make these decisions."

I think there is some misunderstanding here about how things work. Department chairs ask for TT lines and the administration approves or (more often) denies these requests. I doubt there has ever been a department chair who has asked for adjuncts instead of a TT line. In what possible world would that be a good idea? Who would prefer a department of adjuncts to a department of TT faculty? When a university has a bunch of adjuncts bearing the teaching load, it is because the *university administrators* have decided that is the way things should be, not department chairs. (I suppose you could hold faculty responsible for not engaging in concerted political action, like walkouts and the like, and I'd be somewhat sympathetic to that view.)

"And, of course, it is always 'necessary' to replace a full-time faculty member with a part-time (and exploited) one."

How else am I to fill two courses? I can ask for a VAP, but at my school, those are multi-year contracts. I promise you that my administration will not approve a VAP just to fill two ethics sections. I could also ask my colleagues to do it. But they have contracts too, which stipulate that they need not teach more than 3 courses a semester. And guess what, most of them don't *want* to teach more than 3 courses a semester! Even if they did, all this would mean is that some TT faculty member got overtime pay to teach a 4th course, while someone on the job market got diddly-squat.

And if you think adjuncting isn't any good at all for your CV, I can assure you that when my department hires, we look at teaching experience, and someone with no teaching experience will not make it past the first round of cuts. We don't care where that experience comes from -- whether it be adjuncting, VAP-ing, or grad school teaching. You just have to have it.

Finally, none of this is to deny that most adjuncts are grievously exploited.

Anonymous said...

"Finally, none of this is to deny that most adjuncts are grievously exploited."

Just to suggest that it's other people who are exploiting them. (Of course, nobody ever stands up and says, "yes, I'm the one exploiting adjuncts." It's always Someone Else. That Someone Else is a real bastard, and should be stopped.)

Anonymous said...

"It's always Someone Else"

Of course there are conditions under which a department chair can be responsible for exploiting adjuncts, but merely hiring them is not a sufficient condition for that assessment.

zombie said...

I have never met a department chair who wanted adjuncts instead of a TT line. My department recently had an established (but currently vacant) TT line taken away -- the university administration told us we only "needed" to hire lecturers (at less pay, but equal benefits). That TT line was vacant because of a retirement. It is not department chairs who are driving the adjunctification of university faculty -- it's penny-pinching administrators (who make massively more money that us faculty plebes, and control the budgets).

Befehl Army said...

Let me see if I've got this right. Administrators are responsible for adjunctification and faculty are only 'following orders'. Seems legit.

Derek Bowman said...

To be clear, department chairs are complicit in the adjunct hiring they engage in (a point which SLAC chair admits sympathy to... "I suppose you could hold faculty responsible for not engaging in concerted political action, like walkouts and the like, and I'd be somewhat sympathetic to that view.")

But adjunct faculty are also complicit. Adjunct hiring doesn't happen unless somebody - usually the department head - does the scheduling and hiring for those courses. But adjunct hiring also doesn't happen unless someone accepts those positions.

Of course adjuncts may have very strong reasons to accept, as exploited workers often do. But it is a choice, and if it's justified it's because the adjunct has sufficient reason to be complicit in their own exploitation.

Similarly, a department head can refuse to fill classes with part-time faculty, but depending on the institution this is likely to result in being fired, suspended, and/or having resources cut from the department or even eventual department closure.

Of course administrators who dictate the funding that forces these staffing choices also operate under their own contraints and have their own personal needs to keep their jobs.

I'm not suggesting that all these positions are equivalent, but I do think the "it's X's fault," "no it's Y's fault" debate fails to deal with the complicated reality in which all the major participants in adjunct hiring/staffing are complicit. It's just false for any of these participants that they have no choice; the question is one of when that choice is justified and what additional responsibilities such complicity might generate.

Anonymous said...

Unless you think the chair should say, "No, I won't hire an adjunct", I don't see in what way that chair is any more complicit than, say, you.

Anonymous said...

"Unless you think the chair should say, "No, I won't hire an adjunct", I don't see in what way that chair is any more complicit than, say, you."

That would be something, yes. As Derek points out, there are several events that are contributing to the problem. And there is no way to solve the problem unless action is taken in all of those areas. The problem won't be solved by waiting for someone higher up on the food chain to take action. There is no "trickle down activism."

Yes, the chair can draw a line in the sand. And yes, maybe administration starts to choke off resources. Or maybe the chair can try to organize all of the department chairs (or as many as possible) to take the same stand. Maybe students can be enlisted. Maybe the community.

I guess the question for chairs is, what are you willing to sacrifice in order to try and fix the problem? If the answer is "nothing," then yes, chairs are the part of the problem.

Anonymous said...

How long after a campus interview is it appropriate to contact the SC if you haven't from them or the admin? Should you just assume you haven't been picked up, or are not the top choice, and keep waiting, or could there possibly an expectation that you confirm your interest in the job after a given deadline has passed? I mean, it would not totalyl crazy given how the hiring process appears to be working, to think that candidates who do not inquire after weeks must have accepted offers elsewhere.

Anonymous said...

If you were given a timeline for their considerations, you should wait until a couple weeks after that point. If you were not given a timeline, two months after the interview is plenty of time.

However, if you are not hearing from them, it's because they are not trying to hire you. In all likelihood, they are pursuing someone else. You are still an option, should their first choice decline their offer. But these negotiations can sometimes take a while to work out the details, so it could be some time. And if they do hire someone else, they won't tell you until after that process is complete.

And at the risk of sounding cruel, there is no chance that they think you have accepted an offer somewhere else because you have not called to ask about their job.

Anonymous said...

This might be of interest to some folks here: The American Association of University Presses maintains a listing of job openings here. One of the jobs they currently have listed is at the University of Chicago and might be particularly relevant. Here is the link.

Oh and yes, you're qualified for the job. Nope, don't worry about that. Or about that. Yes, I read the job description. Yes, the same one you did. You meet the qualifications. Stop arguing with me about it.

Anonymous said...

Jesus, I have the MA and publishing experience and thought I'd be a strong applicant for that spot. Haven't heard back yet, but would be really blown away if I lost out on an entry level job to a PhD. I keep telling myself the alt ac market for philosophers isn't as bad as the academic market...right? Right?!?!

Anonymous said...

Also don't forget that the job *is* alt-ac. So you're allowed (even encouraged!) to call and ask about your application, email HR, stuff like that.

But no, it's not going to be easier. Publishing in particular is a tough nut to crack. Of course if you apply for all the publishing gigs you can *and* all the academic jobs you can, your odds go up...

Derek Bowman said...

@9:22: Sadly "not as bad as the academic job market" is compatible with "nonetheless very bad." But your comment raises an important point discussed in more detail here: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/508-alt-ac-isn-t-always-the-answer

Short version: Other industries aren't waiting around for humanities PhDs to fill their ranks, and academics do other industries a disservice if we export our credentialing arms race to other job markets. That doesn't mean individual candidates shouldn't apply for such jobs, but it does cast doubt on the idea of "alt-ac" careers as a systematic solution.

Anonymous said...

There were a couple really late adds. Anyone heard from Western Missouri? Saint Mary's? Florida International?

None of them are on the wiki.

Anonymous said...

Florida International position is filled.

Anonymous said...

Western Missouri is filled too.

Anonymous said...

Brian Leiter shares reader emails saying how great he and his blog are.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, those emails are absurd, esp. when anonymous. You can tell they're probably fake because they describe the blog as "fun". Leiter Reports is many things, but I doubt it as ever been fun.

Anonymous said...

Toronto's advertising what are more or less the first jobs of the new season: Ancient and Ethics/Practical:

http://www.universityaffairs.ca/search-job/?job_id=36650
http://www.universityaffairs.ca/search-job/?job_id=36649


Doubtless they'll be on PhilJobs shortly.

Anonymous said...

It's upon us again! Anybody have any info on which departments are going to hire this year, and in which AOS?

Anonymous said...

If it's like last year, phil. of science will be hiring and the rest of us are screwed.

Anonymous said...

@1:57 Whaaa? I think you misspelled `ethics'.

Anonymous said...

4:51 - There was a lot of ethics, yeah, but it's also a much bigger subfield than phil. of science.

Anonymous said...

Two more from Toronto: Phil. of Science and Social & Political.

4 in a year. Damn.

Anonymous said...

"Two more from Toronto: Phil. of Science and Social & Political."

Who knows, they might even find someone who meets their (apparently exacting) standards this year.

Anonymous said...

Toronto? BWAHAHAHAHAHA! I am not a cheerleader and the captain of the football team (Toronto) is not going to consider asking me to the prom. Bring on the trench warfare teaching jobs! I will be ecstatic to work your permanent 4/4 load in the middle of a cornfield for 50k a year! Who is with me?!?!?! [Insert Howard Dean scream here.]

Anonymous said...

@1:41pm
Joke or do these jobs really come with 4/4 and 50k? There's nothing in the ads.

Anonymous said...

Hidden in the "general humanities" category: up to 4 TT positions at UCSD for "practical ethics."

"The University of California, San Diego invites applications from outstanding candidates for up to four separate searches (totaling up to eight positions) for TENURE TRACK or TENURED FACULTY POSITIONS in environmental justice, health care ethics, business ethics, and the social impact of technology, medicine, and science."

https://chroniclevitae.com/jobs/0000326350-01#sthash.VjOVvR2F.dpuf

Anonymous said...

@ 8/10 1:04pm

8/6 1:41pm here. No, I'm not at all joking. They are not many, but they do exist. Thank god (for me).

Anonymous said...

I find it amazing, if not nearly insulting, that Toronto is looking for candidates with features such that most of us will be ruled out from the pool. Good luck to the very few who qualify! Accolades, seriously, that's the latest trick?

"They must have a record of excellence in both research and teaching and show a demonstrated record of ongoing development in both teaching and research. ... The candidate will be expected to conduct innovative research at the highest international level. Excellence in research is evidenced primarily by publications in leading journals in the field, presentations at significant conferences, awards and accolades, a strong research dossier submitted as part of the application and strong letters of reference by referees of high international standing."

Anonymous said...

5:52,

Are you opposed to senior hires on principle, or just at Toronto?

Do you believe that all job vacancies should be open to junior applicants (recent or soon to be graduated PhDs)?

Personally, I prefer seeing adds like this one than those that claim to be "open rank," but are really searches for senior hires.

Anonymous said...

9.45,

As far as I can tell it's a junior hire, so...

Anonymous said...

9:45 - I think 5:52 would be on board with that if Toronto hadn't just had a failed junior search after which applicants were told that nobody in that crop of applicants was good enough to meet their standards. (Which was probably true in virtue of the committee having very different ideas about what they wanted, but that's not what the message said.)

If the thousand or so people who applied last year weren't good enough, then it's clear that Toronto has very, very exacting expectations. Probably unrealistic, but then, they're a really good R1 with a giant department and lots of money, so they can afford those standards. It's just really off-putting, and fits with the image they project (which is one of utter disdain for all but a select few with the right pedigree). It may not be accurate, but that is the image they project.

Anonymous said...

Toronto lost a well-regarded Ancient scholar (Brad Inwood). It looks like they couldn't get a senior TT line, but still want to hire a senior scholar. Either that or they just figure that because the market is so bad (or because they're so amazing) they can basically get a senior-qualified candidate to take a junior position. Bullshit? Yes, but par for the course.

Anonymous said...

@11:51 I didn't know about the failed search last year. It's a little surprising because some of the junior people there wouldn't seem out of place among the crowd of very well qualified applicants one would expect for those kinds of jobs.

Anonymous said...

It's not uncommon for top departments to initiate a search as a pretense to hire a very specific person. And if that person - for whatever reason - chooses not to "apply," they can declare the search a failure and try again the next year. A colleague of mine (in the sciences) was recruited in such a way by another program, and it took two years to land him. The program ran a dummy search and invited him to apply. He decided not to (mostly because of his wife), and the search failed. The following year, they ran the search again, and again invited him to apply. That year, his offer included a job offer for his wife (on campus, but not an academic position), and he accepted.

Anonymous said...

12:52: yeah. It's not just that the search failed, though. It's that afterwards they sent an email telling all their applicants (fwiw I was not among them!) that the search failed because they were unable to find anyone who met their standards.

I'm pretty sure they just meant that the committee couldn't agree on a set of standards, or that it couldn't find anyone over whom they all agreed, which is fair. But that's not quite what they said, and the way you say these things matters, and it's really not that hard to do it right if you care even just a little. So I suspect that's where the animus is coming from.

Anonymous said...

I don't think there's any reason to think Toronto is particularly interested in pedigree. A lot of their faculty have Canadian PhDs, and there's a guy who did his doctoral work at Erfurt, and one from Northwestern, Louvain, Cologne. Of course there are many from top 20 US programs and a bunch from Oxford, but that doesn't seem to me to show any special concern for pedigree.

I think probably they just do have high standards. I know a couple of people they've made offers to who turned them down, and they're very interesting, original philosophers (in my judgment, of course). And why shouldn't they aim high? What's the down side for Toronto in holding out for someone they think of as a cut above the rest?

Anonymous said...

By "a lot of faculty" who have Canadian PhDs, you mean 2 from Western and 7 from *Toronto*...

It's true that a brace (out of fiftyish) have PhDs from places outside the T20 (mostly not from English-speaking countries), but the rest come from Oxford, Pittsburgh, Princeton, Harvard, Yale, UCLA, Michigan, Cornell, Stanford, Berkeley...

Anonymous said...

Yes, that’s what I meant. That’s not a lot?

A brace is two, so I don’t know what you mean by saying that a brace are from outside the T20 mostly not from English speaking countries. Is most of a brace one person? Both?
Counting Toronto and Oxford as T20, and also Cornell (even though counting non-US programs would push Cornell out of T20), I see eight Toronto philosophy faculty members whose degrees are from programs outside that group. I think probably there is a special explanation for why they have so many of their own graduates, another seven, on their staff. It really doesn’t seem to show particular concern with pedigree.

I guess I’ve already spent too much time on this topic. I have no stake in defending Toronto. Really.

Anonymous said...

I guess I wouldn't count hiring your own grads as a mark of diversity, or of special concern for Canadian PhDs (especially considering the only other Canadian PhDs they have are two from Western).

You're right that it's 8, not a brace (well, I counted 7, but I probably missed one). But notice that 47% of their faculty are from just four programs (Toronto, Oxford, Princeton, Pittsburgh), and that it has as many of its own grads as it does non-T20 faculty. Notice also that all of its faculty are from the international T15 except for those 8.

I guess we have different ideas about what counts as a concern for pedigree. I should add, however, that I wasn't just speaking about the degrees listed on their faculty page, but about interactions I've had with Toronto students and faculty.

Like you, however, I don't actually have much of a stake in attacking Toronto (really). I wasn't even a recipient of their crappy rejection letter last year.

Anonymous said...

Question: I recall there being several jobs last year that explicitly required letters of rec. that were tailored to the position. Does anyone recall which jobs those were?

Anonymous said...

Postdocs sometimes require letters tailored to the postdoc project (e.g. SSHRC, Killam, etc.). Other than those, though, I don't think I encountered any.

Anonymous said...

Am I reading this right...? Spanish language courses?

https://www.higheredjobs.com/faculty/details.cfm?JobCode=176343277&Title=Assistant%20Professor%20of%20Philosophy

Anonymous said...

Yes, 6:13 pm: The philosophy faculty appears to belong to the English & Foreign Languages department. Look on the bright side: They currently only have adjuncts, and this appears to be their attempt to make a hire of a full Assistant Professor in philosophy.

Anonymous said...

It seems to me there are more jobs this year. Am I the only one to feel optimistic?

Anonymous said...

It does seem that way, but it might also just be that they're coming (and coming due) earlier. Hard to say. But there have already been a few in my subfield, so it's already a really good year on my end. Sigh.

Anonymous said...

Thank you Community College of Philadelphia for telling me in mid-September that I was not chosen for an interview for a job advertised in 2015 that starts in September. I was wondering whether I should be planning to move to Philly, but that PFO answered all my questions.

Anonymous said...

Quite the opposite, it's seemed pretty slow to me so far this year.

Anonymous said...

This year seems about on par with last year to me, so far. Last year there were 23 jobs in my AOS advertised in the month of September. This year, I've added 18 jobs to my list in September, and, with a week still left in the month, I anticipate adding a few more. So, I'd say we're about in line with last year.

Anonymous said...

Question RE vitae for letters of reference: Has anyone used this? Does it work? Last year my letter writers uploaded and emailed all of their letters for me, but I'd like to take some of the burden off of them. Do I just have to suck it up and pay the interfolio costs for letters or is there an alternative? Please help! Thanks in advance!

Anonymous said...

@7:22. I've used Interfolio for letters for the last two years and been pretty happy with its ease and convenience. The cost is no doubt a burden, though (I spent at least a couple hundred last year). Maybe you could ask for departmental assistance? Something like "I'd like to take some burden off of my letter writers, but the cost of doing so is fairly high. Is there any chance the department can provide some financial assistance for sending letters of recommendation through Interfolio?" If they say no, then I think you have no obligation to take on the costs. If you nevertheless want to take on the costs, I would say I've been pretty happy with Interfolio, though would also love to hear about alternatives.

Anonymous said...

Last year, I had three jobs due by Oct. 1. This year, it's six (plus three non-academics). That said, the pace does seem slower this year.